Classroom Visits

Plimoth Plantation’s Education Department can visit your classroom! 

An In-School Classroom Visit will enhance your curriculum and reinforce all they have learned. 

Is your class unable to travel to Plymouth to tour our living history exhibit sites? Our Museum teachers can travel to you, and provide a one-hour program with either a Pilgrim or Wampanoag (Native) focus. Appropriate programs are available for students Pre-K through Grade 12. 

Interested in booking a program? Make an online reservation request. For more information, including cost and availability, call (508) 746-1622 ext. 8359 or email programs@plimoth.org. 

Colonial Classroom Visit: Life in 1627 Plymouth Colony   

Grades Pre-K–2

Learn about the past with someone from the past! | 45–60-minute program

Imagine the first Thanksgiving! Your students will learn about the feast by meeting a Pilgrim, and playing with objects from Pilgrim daily life. 

Our Museum teacher will dress like a Pilgrim, but speak to the students from a modern perspective. The teacher will wear accurate reproduction Pilgrim clothing and will arrive with a variety of reproduction objects from colonial daily life. In this program, your Museum teacher will begin by introducing the students to Colonial artifacts and clothing, inviting comparisons to their own household objects and wardrobes in the present day. During the second half of the program, students will rotate through a series of “Pilgrim Life” play centers in small groups.

Each program is a 45-minute to one-hour presentation to one classroom. 

Massachusetts Frameworks for History and Social Sciences | Colonial Classroom Visit | pre-K–2

Pre-K–1: "Building a Foundation for Living, Learning, and Working Together"

  • Learn about what happened in times past
  • Recognize and commemorate our shared history as a nation and community
  • Understand how people adapt to or change their environment
  • Understand the kinds of work typical for men, women, and children
  • Learn the connections between geography and economics, and that the natural resources can be specific to the geography of a place and can influence its economic activities

Grade 2: Enhanced understanding of "Building a Foundation for Living, Learning and Working Together"

  • Recognize the reasons why people settled in particular places and why they migrated
  • Understand the culture and traditions of migrants
  • Discover and make use of natural resources for their own consumption for for trading with others
  • Learning how people adapt to or change their environment to meet their needs for survival and living
  • Discover why humans prefer to setle by rivers, bodies of water and in/near certain landforms

 


Grades 2–5

Learn about Plimoth Plantation with a Pilgrim in your classroom! | One-hour program

Our Museum Teacher will portray a resident of 1627 Plimoth Colony, using their life story to frame the program. Your Museum Teacher will speak with a regional, English dialect of the 17th century and wear accurate reproduction clothing to bring the world of Pilgrims to life. Using reproduction artifacts to enhance your classroom’s experience, your visitor will share the Pilgrim story, from hiring Mayflower in England, through the journey and the first winter, to Thanksgiving in Plymouth. As a highlight of the program, two students will be invited to try on colonial clothing!

Each program is a one-hour presentation to one classroom.

Massachusetts Frameworks for History and Social Sciences | Colonial Classroom Visit | Grades 2–5

Grade 2: "Building a Foundation for Living, Learning, and Working Together"

  • Recognize the reasons why people settle in particular places and why they migrated
  • Understand the culture and traditions of migrants
  • Discover and make use of natural resources for their own consumption and for trading with others
  • Learn how people adapt to or change their environment to meet their needs for survival and living
  • Discover why humans prefer to settle by rivers, bodies of water and in/near certain landforms.

Grade 3: "Massachusetts, Home to Many Different People"

History and Social Science Topics

  • Massachusetts cities and towns today and in history
  • The geography and Native peoples of Massachusetts
  • Native peoples' contacts with European explorers
  • The Pilgrims, the Plymouth Colony, and Native peoples
  • The Puritans, the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and Native peoples
  • Massachusetts before, during, and after the American Revolution

Literacy in History and Social Science: In studying these topics, students apply grades 3–5 reading writing and speaking and listening skills, and learn vocabulary concepts related to history and social science.

Grade 4: "North America: Geography and map skills"

  • Ancient civilizations of North America
  • Early European exploration of North America
  • What are the physical features of North America?

Grade 5: Reasearch the early relationships of English settlers to Native peoples inthe 1600's and 1700's, to understand:

  • Impacts of diseases introduced by Europeans in severely reducing native populations
  • The differing views on land ownerships or use, property rights, and the conflicts between the two groups (the Pequot and Kind Philip's Wars in New England)

Topic 3: European explorers' first contacts with Navtive peoples in the Northeast

    Supporting Question: How did European explorers describe the Northeast and its Native peoples?

  • Locate North America, the Atlantic Ocean, and Europe on a map, explain how Native peoples first came into contact with Europeans, and explain why Europeans in the 16th and 17th centuries sailed westward across the Atlantic (e.g., to find new trade routes to Asia and new supplies of natural resources such as metals, timber, and fish).
  • Trace on a map the voyages of European explorers of the Northeast coast of North America (e.g., Giovanni Caboto [John Cabot], Bartholomew Gosnold, Giovanni de Verrazano, John Smith, Samuel de Champlain). 
  • Explain how any one of the explorers described the Native peoples and the new lands, and compare an early 17th century map of New England with a current one.

Topic 4: The Pilgrims, The Plymouth Colony, and Native Communities

    Supporting Question: What were the challenges for women and men in the early years in Plymouth?

  • Explain who the Pilgrim men and women were and why they left Europe to seek a place where they would have the right to practice their religion; describe their journey, the government of their early years in Plymouth Colony, and analyze their relationships with the Wampanoage and Abenaki/Wabanaki people.
  • the purpose of the Mayflower Compact and the principle of self-government
  • challenges for Pilgrim men, women and children in their new home (e.g. building shelter and starting farming, become accustomed to a new environment, maintaining their faith and keeping a community together through self-government)
  • contacts with the Native leaders Samoset and Massasoit, events leading to a celebration to give thanks for the harvest, and subsequent relationships between Europeans and Native peoples in southeastern Massachusetts.

Topic 5: The Puritans, the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Native Peoples and Africans

    Supporting Question: How did the interactions of Native peoples, Europeans, and enslaved and free Africans shape the development of Massachusetts?

  • Compare and contrast the roles and leadership decisions of early English leaders of the Puritans of the Massachusetts Bay colony and the Pilgrims of the Plymouth Colony (e.g. John Winthrop, Miles Standish, William Brewster, Edward Winslow, William Bradford, John Alden, John Cotton, Thomas Hooker) and the roles and decisions of the leaders of Native peoples (e.g., Massosoit; Metacom, also known as King Philip).
  • Explain why Puritan men and women migrated in great numbers to Massachusetts in the 17th century, how they moved west from the Atlantic coast, and the consequences of their migration for the Native peoples of the region (e.g. loss of territory, great loss of life due to susceptibility to European diseases, religious conversion, conflicts over different ways of life such as the Pequot War and King Philip's War).
  • Using visual primary sources such as paintings, artifacts, historic buildings, or text sources, analyze details of daily life, housing education, and work of the Puritan men, women, and children of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, including self-employed farmers and artisans, indentured servants, employees, and enslaved people.
  • Explain the importance of maritime commerce and the practice of bartering—exchanging goods or services without payment in money—in the development of the economy of colonial Massachusetts, using moaterialls from historical socieites and history museums as reference materials.

For more information on Plimoth Plantation educational programs, call (508) 746-1622 ext. 8359 or email programs@plimoth.org or make an online reservation request.   

To receive special offers, and regular updates on Plimoth Plantation’s educational programs, sign up for our Education Mailing List

Thanks to the generosity of foundation and charitable trust grants, funding for classroom visits is sometimes available to eligible schools. For more information, please visit our Foundations for Kids page.


Wampanoag Classroom Visit: People of the East
 

Wampanoag Classroom Visits from Plimoth Plantation teachers

Grades Pre-K–2

Our in-school classroom visits are delivered by Native museum teachers, who dress in modern clothing and speak from a modern perspective. This allows them to discuss the story of their people in past and present times. Our museum teachers will bring a variety of artifacts for students to touch and view, as well as a digital slide show of images about Wampanoag life. Please have a “Smartboard,” an LCD projector or a screen that can be connected to our laptop. To simplify set-up, please have the set-up ready prior to our arrival.

Each program is a one-hour presentation to one classroom.

Massachusetts Frameworks for History and Social Sciences | Wampanoag Classroom Visit | Pre-K–2

Pre-K–1 "Building a Foundation for Living, Learning and Working Together"

  • Learn about what happened in times past
  • Recognize and commemorate our shared history as a nation and community
  • Understand how people adapt to or change their environment
  • Understand the typical work of men, women, and children
  • Learn the connections between geography and economics, and that the natural resources can be specific to the geopgraphy of a place and can influence its economic activies

Grade 2 Enhanced understanding of "Building a Foundation for Living, Learning, and Working Together"

  • Recognize the reasons why people settle in particular places and why they migrated
  • Understand the culture and trations of migrants
  • Discover and make use of natural resources for their own consumption and for trading with others
  • Learn how people adapt to or change their environment to meet their needs for survival and living
  • Discover why humans prefer to settle by rivers, bodies of water and in/near certain landforms

 


Grades 2–5

Learn about the daily life of the Wampanoag in the 17th century, as well as their current lives and communities. Students will gain an understanding of the connection the Wampanoag and other Native people have to Mother Earth, their seasonal way of life and their respect for all living beings. Our Native American Museum Teacher will show a PowerPoint presentation filled with colorful photographs from Plimoth Plantation’s Wampanoag Homesite and pass around artifacts of traditional life, such as wooden bowls and spoons, animal furs and tools. Our Native Museum Teacher will wear modern clothing and speak from a modern perspective, so that they can discuss the story of their people in both past and present times.

Necessary Equipment: Smartboard, or an LCD projector or screen that can be connected to our laptop or accessibility with a USB drive.

Each program is a one-hour presentation to one classroom.

Massachusetts Frameworks for History and Social Sciences | Wampanoag Classroom Visit | Grades 2–5

Grade 3 "Massachusetts, Home to Many Different People"

History and Social Science Topics

  • Massachusetts cities and towns today and in history
  • The geography and Native peoples of Massachusetts
  • Native peoples' contacts with European explorers
  • The Pilgrims, the Plymouth Colony, and Native people
  • The Puritans, the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and Native peoples
  • Massachusetts before, during, and after the American Revolution

In studying these topics, students apply grades 3–5 reading, writing, and speaking and listening skills, and learn vocabulary and concepts related to history and social science.

  • Explain who the Pilgrim men and women were and analyze their relationships with the Wampanoag and Abenaki/Wabanaki people.
  • Explain how any one of the explorers described the Native Peoples 
  • Describe contacts with the Native leaders Samoset and Massasoit, events leading to a celebration to give thanks for the harvest, and subsequent relationships between Europeans and Native peoples in southeastern Massachusetts
  • Compare and contrast the roles and leadership decisions of early English leaders of the Puritans of Massachusetts Bay Colony and the Pilgrims of the Plymouth Colony (e.g. John Winthrop, Miles Standish, William Brewster, Edward Winslow, William Bradford, John Alden, John Cotton, Thomas Hooker) and the roles and decisions of the leaders of Native peoples (e.g., Massasoit; Metacom, also known as King Philip).
  • Explain consequences of Puritan men and women's migration west from the Atlantic coast for the Native peoples of the region (e.g., loss of territory, great loss of life due to susceptibility to European diseases, religious conversion, conflicts over different ways of life such as the Pequot War and King Philip's War).

Grade 4 North America: Geography and map skills

  • Ancient civilizations of North America
  • Early European exploration of North America
  • What are the physical features of North America?
  • What were the reasons for European migration across the Atlantic Ocean?
  • Describe the diverse cultural nature of the region contributions of Native people and English settlers? 

Grade 5 Building on knowledge from previous years

  • Explain the early relationships of English settlers to Native Peoples in the 1600's and 1700's, including the impact of diseases introduced by Europeans in severely reducing Native populations, the differing views on land ownership or use, property rights, and the conflicts between the two groups (e.g., the Pequot and King Philip's wars in New England).

For more information on Plimoth Plantation educational programs, call (508) 746-1622 ext. 8359 or email programs@plimoth.org or make an online Reservation Request.   

To receive special offers, and regular updates on Plimoth Plantation’s educational programs, sign up for our Education Mailing List. 

 

Virtual Field Trips to Plimoth Plantation

Can't travel to us? We can visit you via the web! Using two-way interactive videoconferencing, SKYPE, students will be able to visit with a Plimoth Plantation Museum Educator during engaging, informational and interactive hour-long virtual field trips. Your students can talk with a Wampanoag (Native) Museum teacher, chat with a Pilgrim, or learn all about the history of Thanksgiving. Each program is a one-hour presentation to one classroom; maximum of 25 students per classroom.

For schools outside Southern New England only. 

For more information on Plimoth Plantation educational programs, call (508) 746-1622 ext. 8359 or email programs@plimoth.org or make an online Reservation Request.   

CLICK HERE FOR OUR VIRTUAL CLASSROOM VISIT INFORMATION GUIDE!

To receive special offers, and regular updates on Plimoth Plantation’s educational programs, sign up for our Education Mailing List. 

Thanks to the generosity of foundation and charitable trust grants, funding for classroom visits is sometimes available to eligible schools. For more information, please visit our Foundations for Kids page. 

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